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Billdata Timeline
27.05.2021
: legislature
Presented to Secretary of State on May 26, 2021
26.05.2021
: legislature
Certificate
26.05.2021
: legislature
Communication
26.05.2021
passage: executive
Passed notwithstanding objections of the Governor 30-19-0
26.05.2021
: legislature
McCollister MO110 prevailed
26.05.2021
filing: executive
McCollister MO110 Becomes law notwithstanding the objections of the Governor filed
26.05.2021
: executive
Returned by Governor without approval on May 25, 2021
21.05.2021
executive-receipt: executive
Presented to Governor on May 20, 2021
20.05.2021
passage: legislature
President/Speaker signed
20.05.2021
passage: legislature
Passed on Final Reading with Emergency Clause 33-11-5
18.05.2021
reading-3: legislature
Placed on Final Reading Second
13.05.2021
: legislature
Advanced to Enrollment and Review for Reengrossment
13.05.2021
: legislature
McCollister AM1421 adopted
13.05.2021
filing: legislature
Returned to Select File for specific amendment
12.05.2021
filing: legislature
McCollister AM1421 filed
04.05.2021
reading-3: legislature
Placed on Final Reading
28.04.2021
: legislature
Advanced to Enrollment and Review for Engrossment
28.04.2021
: legislature
Arch AM1196 adopted
28.04.2021
filing: legislature
Arch AM1196 filed
28.04.2021
: legislature
McCollister AM1082 adopted
28.04.2021
: legislature
Enrollment and Review ER60 adopted
27.04.2021
filing: legislature
McCollister AM1082 filed
20.04.2021
filing: legislature
Enrollment and Review ER60 filed
20.04.2021
filing: legislature
Placed on Select File with ER60
14.04.2021
: legislature
Advanced to Enrollment and Review Initial
14.04.2021
: legislature
McCollister AM975 adopted
14.04.2021
filing: legislature
McCollister AM975 filed
30.03.2021
: legislature
Lathrop name added
29.03.2021
: legislature
Kolterman name added
24.03.2021
: legislature
Bostar name added
23.03.2021
: legislature
Cavanaugh, J. name added
23.03.2021
: legislature
Day name added
23.03.2021
: legislature
McKinney name added
23.03.2021
: legislature
DeBoer name added
12.03.2021
: legislature
McCollister priority bill
09.03.2021
filing: legislature
Placed on General File
10.02.2021
: legislature
Notice of hearing for February 17, 2021
12.01.2021
: legislature
Hansen, M. name added
11.01.2021
referral-committee: legislature
Referred to Health and Human Services Committee
07.01.2021
introduction: legislature
Date of introduction
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CAMPAIGN DESCRIPTION

Nebraska's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, aka: food stamps) is structured in a way that penalizes hardworking families for improving their lives. For those who barely qualify, one small salary increase could push their gross income over the eligibility limit even though their net income is within the restrictions, resulting in a loss of SNAP benefits larger than the increase in pay. This is referred to as the SNAP Cliff Effect. It forces low-income workers to choose between either a small increase in pay or the ability to feed their family. If LB108 or the SNAP Cliff Effect Bill is passed, it will rectify this problem by increasing the gross income eligibility limit allowing low-income workers with a net income within limits qualify for SNAP benefits. Low-income workers will no longer have to turn down economic opportunity in order to continue feeding their families. Cecilia, for example, was ecstatic when she was presented with the opportunity to move up in her company and was offered a small increase in pay. She happily accepted the offer, assuming that this was a step toward increasing her family's financial independence. However, even though the wage increase was barely enough to make a impact on their lives, and her net income was still at poverty level, it pushed her gross income above SNAP limits. She lost all of her much-needed benefits. Her promotion should have been something to celebrate. Instead, her family is struggling more than ever to put food on the table. SNAP is the largest federal food assistance program operated to address food insecurity in the United States. It helps recipients buy food which raises nutrition levels among low-income households. About three-fourths of SNAP recipients live in households with children and more than a fourth live in households with seniors or people with disabilities. It is estimated that around 70,000 families are in the SNAP program in Nebraska. This bill would only affect families whose net income is at poverty level but whose gross income disqualifies them from the program. Nebraska continues to fall behind on providing SNAP benefits to those in need. Nationally, 29 percent of food insecure people do not qualify for federal nutrition assistance (including SNAP) compared to 44 percent in Lancaster County. Additionally nationally, 21 percent of food insecure children do not qualify for federal nutrition assistance (including SNAP) compared to 39 percent in Lancaster County. This is a huge gap between need and services in our community that raising the gross income eligibility limit will help address. SNAP is federally funded, but states have to share the administrative costs of executing SNAP with the federal government. However, with the passage of the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, the federal government assumed responsibility of all administrative costs for the next three years, lessening the pressure on state budgets. At no cost to the state, LB108 would address the SNAP Cliff Effect to encourage hard work and employment in Nebraska and ensure that families can continue to put food on the table.


TALKING POINTS
  • It is estimated that every $1 of local SNAP spending generates approximately $1.79 in local economic benefits.
  • As of March 1st, 2021, more than 14% of households with children said they sometimes or often don't have enough to eat according to the US Census Bureau.
  • Just over 2 out of 5 children suffering food insecurity in Lancaster County do not qualify for federal nutrition assistance programs, including SNAP.