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Billdata Timeline
26.05.2021
executive-signature: executive
Approved by Governor on May 24, 2021
20.05.2021
executive-receipt: executive
Presented to Governor on May 19, 2021
19.05.2021
passage: legislature
President/Speaker signed
19.05.2021
: legislature
Correctly enrolled
19.05.2021
passage: legislature
Passed on Final Reading with Emergency Clause stricken 31-6-12
19.05.2021
failure: legislature
Failed on Final Reading with Emergency Clause 31-6-12
04.05.2021
reading-3: legislature
Placed on Final Reading
28.04.2021
: legislature
Advanced to Enrollment and Review for Engrossment
28.04.2021
: legislature
DeBoer AM1187 adopted
28.04.2021
: legislature
Enrollment and Review ER65 adopted
28.04.2021
filing: legislature
DeBoer AM1187 filed
23.04.2021
filing: legislature
Enrollment and Review ER65 filed
23.04.2021
filing: legislature
Placed on Select File with ER65
20.04.2021
: legislature
Advanced to Enrollment and Review Initial
20.04.2021
: legislature
Health and Human Services AM764 adopted
20.04.2021
: legislature
DeBoer AM1057 adopted
20.04.2021
filing: legislature
DeBoer AM1057 filed
30.03.2021
filing: legislature
Health and Human Services AM764 filed
30.03.2021
filing: legislature
Placed on General File with AM764
12.03.2021
: legislature
DeBoer priority bill
25.02.2021
: legislature
Vargas name added
03.02.2021
: legislature
Notice of hearing for February 10, 2021
20.01.2021
referral-committee: legislature
Referred to Health and Human Services Committee
15.01.2021
introduction: legislature
Date of introduction
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CAMPAIGN DESCRIPTION

Every child deserves access to high quality early care and education. LB485 is an important child care subsidy bill that would expand initial eligibility for the child care subsidy program to Nebraska families whose income is at or under 185% of the federal poverty level, which translates to $49,025 annually for a family of four.(1) Additionally, it would allow families to continue to receive the subsidy if their income stays below 200% of the federal poverty level, allowing them to continue their upward mobility without worry of losing the much-needed subsidy. Parents all over the state have long encountered issues finding quality, affordable child care for their children. When looking at infant care specifically, the numbers are shocking. The average annual cost of infant care in Nebraska is $12,571—that’s $1,048 per month and 24.4% more than average rent in Nebraska.(2) According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), child care is affordable if it costs no more than 7% of a family’s income. By this standard, only 5.8% of Nebraska families can afford infant care. The numbers aren't much better for older children; child care for a 4-year-old costs $11,420 annually, or $952 each month. Simply put, quality child care is out of reach for low-income families.(2) This struggle that many families are facing wounds the Nebraska economy. The state loses $745 million annually because parents drop out of the work force, cut back their hours, or simply move elsewhere because they can’t find child care, according to a study conducted before the pandemic.(3) The proposed increase in eligibility for the child care subsidy program would help low-income caregivers afford the child care critical to maximizing their contributions to the workforce and providing for their families. Although issues with the child care system in Nebraska have been around for a long time, COVID-19 has exposed and exacerbated the problem. More than 51% of the 1,050 parents who responded to a COVID-19 child care survey reported that they had to miss work because of child care issues during COVID-19. Nearly half, 44%, said they had to reduce their work hours because of child care issues. And more than one out of every three Nebraska parents surveyed, 38%, said they don’t have sufficient child care for their needs. Business owners who responded to the survey also reported massive challenges stemming from a lack of child care for their employees. 71% of employers said their workers have been late, left work, or missed work because of child care problems.(4) Every child in Nebraska deserves the opportunity to thrive in quality early child care and education. This care is critical to the Nebraska economy and subsidy reform could help Nebraska recover from the devastation of the pandemic. 1. "2021 ECEAP Federal Income Eligibility Limits," Department of Children, Youth, and Families of Washington, (Feb 2020), https://www.dcyf.wa.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/eceap/ECEAPFederalPovertyLevel2021.pdf 2. "The Cost of Childcare in Nebraska," Economic Policy Institute, (Updated Oct 2020), https://www.epi.org/child-care-costs-in-the-united-states/#/NE 3. "The Bottom Line: Economic Impacts of Inadequate Child Care Access in Nebraska," First Five Nebraska, (Aug 2020), http://www.firstfivenebraska.org/uploads/Bottom_Line_Report-FINAL.pdf 4. "Examination of the Fiscal and Economic Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Nebraska's Early Childhood Workforce and the Early Childhood Care and Education System," Appropriations Committee of the Nebraska Legislature, (Dec 2020), https://nebraskalegislature.gov/pdf/reports/committee/appropriations/lr390_2020.pdf


TALKING POINTS
  • Infant care in Nebraska costs $4,383 (53.5%) more per year than in-state tuition for four-year public college.
  • The average annual cost of infant care in Nebraska is $12,571—that’s $1,048 per month.
  • Child care for a 4-year-old costs $11,420 annually, or $952 each month.
  • A minimum wage worker in Nebraska would need to work full time for 35 weeks, or from January to September, just to pay for child care for one infant.